Beer 28: Excellent Belgian Tripel made with American Barley

Books will tell you to use a quality Belgian Pilsner malt for a Belgian Tripel. Until now, I have heeded that advice. It’s probably essential, right?

Nope.

This is the best Belgian Tripel I’ve made to date, and it’s made with 100% Briess 2-row malt, the workhorse of brewing, with a little Belgian aromatic malt. Banana, clove, huge yeast flavor, some body, nice color, very drinkable. It’s still young, but this is delicious. I’m happy to put it alongside my commercial favorites, like Sapient Tripel from Dark Horse. I really like how the 2-row seems to compliment the yeast. The aromatic malt, I think, adds a nice maltiness to the mix. Not a lot, just enough. I’ve always been confused as to what exactly aromatic malt does (supposedly it adds malt aroma). The slight sweetness from the Aromatic malt is also nice, although I would dial that back a few ounces maybe. Also I wouldn’t mind just a little more clean bitterness from Magnum hops, using Saaz only for the flame out hops. Other than that, I wouldn’t change anything. I believe the vitality starter and fermentation might have played a factor in how delicious this is (more on that below).

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Astonishingly, I cranked this big beer out in 1 week and was drinking it in 16 days. And I don’t keg. Hot temperature = fast fermentation.

2-Row Tripel
12 lb 2-row
.5 lb Aromatic malt (Dingemans)
2 lb Cane Sugar (added end of boil)
—————————-
2 oz Saaz (30 minute boil)
1 oz Saaz FO
———–
Monestary Ale Yeast (vitality starter)

Sat. Sept 17th: brewday, began vitality starter 4 hours prior to brewing
Sunday morning: pitched yeast @ 67F
Monday morning: noticed krusen, rose temp to 72F
Tuesday morning: rose temp to 80F
Tuesday night: noticed krusen had dropped already, rose temp to 85F
Wed. morning: rose to 90F; Wed night, hydrometer says 1.006, probably done fermenting: back down to 72F for ‘diacetyl rest’
Thurs 5pm: cold crashed to 30F
Saturday (a week after brewday): bottled 29 22oz beers
Monday, Oct 3: carbonated, tastes great. 16 days from grain to glass

Vitality Starter and Fermentation
I’m still tinkering around with how to ferment the best Belgian Tripel, and obviously I’m sold on the gradual, hot fermentation method: that’s how the Belgians do it. For this beer, I  really cranked up the heat, reaching 90 degrees at one point. I will probably continue with this sort of schedule. My vitality starter, as I explain elsewhere, is a matter of squeezing the liquid yeast into a jar of pre-made wort and letting it wake up for a few hours. Did it help? Who knows. But this is the problem with introducing new techniques to your brewing. You make a good beer, assume it’s because of the new technique, and consequently doomed to reproduce the new technique for the rest of your life. That happens all the time with homebrewing.

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